African Languages, Development and the State by Richard Fardon

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By Richard Fardon

This exhibits that multilingusim doesn't pose for Africans the issues of communique that Europeans think and that the mismatch among coverage statements and their pragmatic results is a much more major problem for destiny improvement

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As the most sustained attempt to reconcile top-down and bottom-up perspectives on Africa’s language problem, Laitin’s argument deserves the attention of all policy makers who wish to ease the pain of transition to an outcome he feels is inevitable. Whether the games theoretic, equilibrium outcome will eventuate is more difficult to predict. Nigerian policy (see notes 13 and 15) clearly tends in this direction, at least programmatically. But it is not obvious that the state will be able to afford to implement its policy, or indeed have the political means or will to do so.

In any nation state, language is also often regarded as a symbol of nationality. This, in turn, is based on the equally wellknown function of language as a solidarity marker. A speech community has its ‘in-group’ language that marks it off from other speech communities. This same speech community may have an ‘out-group’ language that it shares with a wider group. Alternatively, the solidarity function of a language may be restricted to special purposes, such as religion. In all these cases, language marks a person as belonging to a group which may vary from a village community or a religious sect, to an ethnic group or the entire nation.

Multilingualism, Minority Languages and Language Policy in Nigeria, Agbor: Central Books Ltd. in collaboration with the Linguistic Association of Nigeria. Said, E. (1978) Orientalism, London: Routledge and Kegan Paul. Sofunke, B. N. ) Multilingualism, Minority Languages and Language Policy in Nigeria, Agbor: Central Books Ltd. in collaboration with the Linguistic Association of Nigeria. Soyinka, W. (1976) Myth, Literature and the African World, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Treffgarne, C.

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